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My Igbo brothers, before it is too late, by Hassan Gimba

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The Igbo are a resilient lot, an egalitarian and industrious people. Defined as a meta-ethnicity native and one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa, they are predominant in South Eastern and mid-western Nigeria. Though there is a claim by some of them that they descended from Jews, the World Culture Encyclopaedia has it that the Igbo people have no common traditional story of their origins. It said historians have proposed two major theories of Igbo origins. One claims the existence of a core area, or “nuclear Igboland.” The other claims they descended from waves of immigrants from the north and the west who arrived in the fourteenth or fifteenth century. Three of such immigrant people are the Nri, Nzam and Anam.

I have known the Igbo since I opened my eyes, and I have nothing but respect and admiration for them. Mrs Nwosu and Ogualili were among my primary school teachers. I went through the hands of Mrs Ogualili in Shehu Garbai Primary School in Maiduguri twice – first in my primary five and then seven when she saw me through my first school leaving certificate examinations.

As a student, I had some of them also in the same class in both my primary and secondary schools. Frank Nweke Jnr, a former minister, was my classmate in primary school. Brilliant chap, he was.

At Government College, Maiduguri, among others, Michael Onyia, Christopher Ononogbu, Boniface Edeh, Joseph Anumudu, Felix Udeh and Peter Achukwu were among my classmates. Michael Onyia, now a PhD and lecturer at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, was always ahead of the set academically. Peter Achukwu is now a Professor in Medical Laboratory Sciences, specialising in Histopathology/Histochemistry with an LLB, BL to boot. He is also a lecturer at UNN.

People will understand, therefore, when I say I have nothing but respect and admiration for them. The Igbo, on average, can be generous and will do all it takes to build someone into becoming someone responsible. They have the best apprenticeship mentoring system in the world, where the mentor sets up the apprentice after a period of training.

I nearly married one, Uzoamaka, in 1990, but that should be a story for another day. However, I offered my junior sister—same parents—to an Igbo secondary school classmate when I realised he wanted to marry a northerner. He ended up marrying someone from abroad, though.

In the 70s, the civil war was fresh, understandably, but by 1979 and through the 1980s up to 2015, the Igbo had been fully integrated into Nigeria and were (still are) major players.

From 1979 to 1983, they occupied the slot of vice president. Ebitu Ukiwe was President Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida’s deputy before Augustus Aikhomu displaced him. They have had chiefs of staff, especially that of the army, Senate presidents, Senate deputy presidents, deputy Speakers in the House of Representatives, and many more positions. There is no position in Nigeria that the Igbo has not held, including the presidency if Goodluck Ebele Jonathan can be regarded as an Igbo by default.

Therefore, when the Igbo man cries “marginalisation!” I wonder if I knew its meaning.

The North East has not tasted power at the apex since Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, yet they have not cried of being “marginalised” by their North Western brothers who will tell them “One North” but when all come “home”, they always take the larger portion of the cake.

In 1979, the North West knew the North East’s Malam Adamu Ciroma was head and shoulders above all the presidential aspirants of the party that won the presidency that year, but they connived to deny him the ticket. Same with 1992. When they realised he would defeat Umaru Shinkafi at the National Republican Convention’s staggered primary elections, they again conspired to scuttle his journey. After doing him in, they went on and truncated another North Easterner, Ambassador Babagana Kingibe’s presidential drive, denying him victory even as a vice-presidential candidate. Alhaji Atiku Abubakar too has suffered the same fate.

Yet the North East did not lament. They did not threaten to break away. The temptation to blame others for their “woes” did not cross their minds. Cries of marginalisation did not sweep over them. No. They will sit down and re-strategise, then make their brothers an offer they cannot refuse: They will present their best who will hopefully best their best. This is politics. It is what democracy is all about. The business of give-and-take. No hairsplitting or inviting the god of thunder or threatening Armageddon.

Again, if people are backward, unable to witness any development in their areas, as the Igbos cry, they should go to the source and address it. Would it be fair for an Anambra man, for instance, to accuse a Hausa man of under-development in his state? Methinks it will not look nice. Members of the state house of assembly are all Igbos, same for cabinet members and all local government officials. Those representing the state at the national level are all Igbos and the governor who got elected into office by his fellow Igbo is also one of them. Their full allocation comes to them, as well. So, where did someone from another area cause the problem? How did he do them in?

It is too late for Nigeria now to divide into only God knows how many components. Perhaps 1966 was the best time. Yes, maybe. Perchance by now, we would all have been independent nationalities, each with its peculiar problems and prospects. But now? No way, sir! We are all safer in a united Nigeria. None of the six geopolitical zones can survive outside Nigeria. Bandits, insurgents, militants, megalomaniacs, charlatans and all would overwhelm us. Even the Igbo nation cannot stand on its own if left to the whims, arrogance and demagoguery of its self-anointed secessionist leader who Yoweri Museveni will look like a saint when compared to.

But many intelligent Igbo know this. The problem is there is a herd movement towards something that the gullible, used cannon fodder do not even know what it is. To them, it is “freedom”. Sure? Freedom from what? From where? From who? If it happens, which is doubtful, it is then they will recall Nigeria with nostalgia and rue over a Nigerian slang “one chance”. They would realise its real meaning, albeit late in the day. This is assuming various warlords have not emerged to deny everyone peace. And freedom. And therefore I sympathise with my good friends, my brothers across the Niger.

A herd movement like the IPOB has its driving spirit and being populated mainly by society’s dregs with nothing to lose, a certain force with a promise of violence pushes it. The level-headed can easily get intimidated and blackmailed into sheepish silence.

There is nothing the good and visionary can do when demagogues opiate the minds and souls of the gullible herd. Or so it seems. But we should also keep in mind Edmund Burke’s letter to Thomas Mercer, a 19th century Judge. A summary of the letter is: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

But sometimes one gets disappointed in how the situation was left to deteriorate to this level. Of course, we know that once there is no fairness or justice in a land, agitations take over. In 1966 when life was snuffed out of some leading northern military and political leaders, the chant in the North was for “Araba” (separation) because the North felt the military regime then was not fair and just to it.

The only way we can slow down and perhaps reverse the impending doom is for all to feel included and carried along in affairs despite scarce resources. We have a lot to learn from how Quebec and Ireland are being handled by the Canadian and British governments, respectively.

Nnamdi Kanu, who Aisha Yesufu described as a ‘made-in-China Shekau’ and his IPOB and ESM always deny what everyone knows were perpetrated by them. This is unlike the Boko Haram insurgents who are eager to own what they did and didn’t do as long as it was sinister. This means there is still hope that they could be persuaded to return from their fatal journey, a journey that will only cause untold pains to all on both sides. We need not go through what we had gone through before. Even animals learn from experience, sometimes referred to as history.

We that are in Nigeria should not heed the calls of those safely ensconced in the safety and comfort of the lands of the Whiteman to put our house ablaze. Let anyone who loves us and wants to fight for us remain within us, as Gandhi and Mandela did for their people. We shouldn’t put our lives and those of our loved ones, our properties and years of labour and sweat on the line for one brigand in disguise, a charlatan living off our sweat in comfort abroad.


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Just a reminder, Mr President, by Dan Agbese

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 Let us begin by stating the obvious, the very obvious. Presidents are busy, very busy people. They have to think and plan for the lives of millions of their people and, of course, the next level in the social, economic and political development of their countries. In addition, they are bombarded with requests from contractors and others who rely on their say-so to change their economic fortunes by the time you say contractors. Sometimes the thought occurs to me that it would be nice to restructure the ears of presidents with additional ears to help them take in all the views and the voices of the people. Four ears must be better than two. 

            It seems to me, and it is inevitable, really, that sometimes a president is quite often diverted from a particular course of action or the full implementation of a critical decision by the many pressures piled upon him daily and nightly, even. Thus, a road on the drawing board finds itself stuck there; thus, reports of panels, commissions and sundry agencies intended to address certain problems, find themselves in a lonely existence on government shelves. 

 This situation and its deleterious effect on a country is such that it reduces movement to motion. It is the duty of all citizens, old codgers like young sincerely not excepted, to occasionally remind our president of decisions waiting to be taken and policy decisions crying to be implemented to aid, if not accelerate, the forward movement. I wish to remind President Muhammadu Buhari that because the heavy pressures of the affairs of state had forced him not to do what he intended to do when he initiated the action on Ibrahim Magu, his final decision on his fate has left him in limbo and baffled the rest of us.

On July 10, 2020, the president shocked the nation when he suddenly suspended his anti-corruption tsar, the acting chairman of EFCC, Ibrahim Magu. In a cruel turn of events, the chief hunter of the alleged corrupt found himself in the same cage with those he hunted and caged. Rotten eggs promptly landed on Buhari’s face; guilty as he is of poor judgement and the autocratic wisdom that have time and again done no justice to his statesmanship.

When he sought to appoint Magu in 2015, the senate, relying on a damaging report on him by the DSS, rejected him as unfit to head the commission. Buhari chafed. He did not believe the senate had any right to question his right to choose who heads the commission. He dared the senate and re-submitted Magu’s name to it for confirmation. The senate dared him and still turned him down. 

Still, the president insisted that Magu, and no other, was fit enough for the office; the senate and the DSS be damned. A faux pas. In doing so, he undermined the enabling law of the commission. Section 3 of the act setting up the commission stipulates that the chairman and the members of the commission “shall be appointed by the president and the appointment shall be subject to confirmation by the senate.” The law does not provide for an acting chairman and no president before Buhari had an acting chairman of the commission. 

Anyway, Magu supported by the illegal act, began his long reign as acting chairman of the commission. In late June or early July 2020, his reign expectedly ended when he found himself on the other side of the anti-graft war. He was arrested and detained. His nemesis was the attorney-general of the federation and minister of justice, Abubakar Malami, who wrote a letter to the president in which he levelled 12 allegations bordering on corruption and corrupt practices against Magu. Some of the allegations were quite serious, to wit, “alleged discrepancies in the reconciliation records of the EFCC and the federal ministry of finance on recovered funds; the declaration of N539 billion as recovered funds instead of N504 billion earlier claimed.” 

Some of the allegations were frivolous and amounted to silly complaints or incompetence rather than criminal offences against Magu by Malami. They smacked of a power tussle between them. Magu, of course, denied the allegations and sought to portray them as acts of vindictiveness on the part of the attorney-general.

To suggest that Buhari’s blue-eyed boy in whom he was so well-pleased allegedly allowed palm oil to drip from all his fingers must have been difficult for the president to process. He rightly decided not to act on Malami’s say-so. He needed hard evidence established by an impartial team of investigators. On July 3, 2020, he appointed a 7-man presidential investigation panel headed by Justice Ayo Salami to do just that. The panel was given 45 days for its assignment. Salami, known to be a serious-minded jurist, took on the presidential assignment seriously with, according to several media reports, Malami breathing down his neck.

On November 20, 2020, the panel submitted its report to the president. Salami noted that the panel “embarked on a nationwide physical verification of recovered forfeited assets, comprising real estates, automobiles, vessels and non-cash assets.” We, the people, perked up our ears, hungry for the full facts established by the panel. Instead, there then began this long reign of silence with Buhari keeping sealed lips over the report. The president neither released the report to the public nor did he, as is the tradition, appoint a committee to produce a government white paper on it. 

The last time I checked Magu was still in suspended in limbo. He had neither been interdicted, let alone arraigned before a court of law to fully answer for his alleged cases of corruption. But Buhari has since appointed a new EFCC, chairman AbdulRasheed Bawa, thus foreclosing any hopes that Magu, even if cleared by the Salami panel could get his job back.

The question the public wants answered is: did the panel find the allegations against Magu to be true? The whole purpose of the Salami panel was for it to answer that question. If the panel cleared Magu, Buhari should say so and let him return to his job in the Nigeria Police. If the panel found him guilty as alleged, he should be charged before a court of law and let him defend himself. These are the two options open to Buhari; unless, of course, he set up the panel to deceive the public and never intended to do anything about its report.

Two points need to be made here as important reminders to the president on why he should release the report to the public. One, the anti-graft war does not admit of secrecy for the sake of secrecy. The public has the right to know what is happening and why. Buhari’s silence would only fuel speculations that Magu was a victim of a power tussle between him and Malami and that the former lost because the latter had the upper hand, thanks to his closeness to the president. The public is aware of the role Malami has played in the Magu saga and it is in some respects unsavoury. 

Even before the ink dried on the panel recommendation that most of the assets were dilapidated and should be sold, Malami appointed a 22-man committee to sell them off when the president had not even received the report. Was Magu sacrificed to satisfy Malami’s greed and his insatiable power grab and interference in the commission’s work resented by Magu? His hands are in all the pies. Magu may have become history in the commission but he casts a long shadow on it so long as people see him as a victim of a cabal whose bidding he refused to do. In other words, he might not have been the victim of the anti-graft war but a victim all the same.

Two, from the bits and pieces filtering out from the report, the Salami panel is said to have made some important recommendations on rejigging the commission to strengthen it and re-position it to wage the war to regain public confidence in it. You are not hearing it from me that despite the long running war, corruption shows no signs of retreating. Our country is still in the same global corruption league with Bangladesh and other countries. Something must be wrong. Perhaps, it is time to do things differently such as prosecuting alleged offenders on the basis of evidence, not on the basis of incomplete investigation.Release the report, Mr President. Magu deserves to know his fate. The public deserves to know the facts about his alleged offences. If he was wrong, do not protect him. If his hands are clean, say so and let him go home with some personal respect and dignity.

Email: [email protected]


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Midway to Nirvana: The story of hope in Borno, by Inuwa Bwala

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Above should be the title of Professor Babagana Umara Zulum’s midterm report as Governor of Borno State. He may not boast of having taken Borno to where he hoped to, but there are very strong indications, that, even in the face of the serious challenges facing the State, there is light at the end of the tunnel and it is only a matter of time before she gets out of the doldrum.


Unlike others, he does not need hired hands to tell his success stories, as the name of the Borno State helmsman is today the beautiful lyrics on the lips of most Nigerians, when you talk of leadership.


In the next few weeks, the media space will be awash with various analysis of how state governors have performed in the last two years. While some may say that, the security situation, cum the living conditions of most Nigerians leave little or no room for celebrations, the ritual in Nigeria, celebrating the turn of every year of governance cannot be ignored.


As such, Nigerians have adapted to listening to, or reading or even watching stories depicting performances. But Nigerians do not need to listen to, read or watch Babagana Umara Zulum as most of them are by now familiar with his leadership style. Ask most Nigerians on the street, and they are bound to single out Borno State Governor, Professor Babagana Umara Zulum, as one of the best. One cannot fault the Governor either if he beats his chest, for making his mark even in the face of the daunting challenges posed by Boko Haram and ISWAP.


Against the national outcry, that the problems of Nigeria oscillate around leadership, Zulum did not leave anybody in doubt from inception that, he would make the difference in leadership, hence, hitting the ground running, so to say, on assumption of office.


It is no longer news that, Borno has been the epicenter of Boko Haram activities in the last eleven years. It is also a fact that the chunk of the state’s resources, under successive regimes since the outbreak of the insurgency have gone into managing the situation and rebuilding damaged infrastructure.


The creation of the Ministry of Rehabilitation, Reconstruction and Resettlement, RRR, may not have come at a better time, just as no better choice than Professor Babagana Umara Zulum as the pioneer Commissioner in charge of the Ministry.


The people of Borno state shall always pay tribute to the exceptional vision of Zulum’s predecessor, Senator Kashim Shettima for insisting on Zulum as his successor, against all odds. Professor Zulum’s exposure at the Ministry of RRR may have prepared him very well for the job of the Governor. He assumed office with a clearly defined goal, which he combined with his well known passion for peace and development. Infact, those who often analyse his ten point agenda always focus on peace and development as the fulcrum.


The immediate task Zulum set out to achieve immediately he assumed office, has been the restoration of peace in areas most affected by the insurgency and the resettlement of displaced people to their ancestral abodes.
In doing this, Zulum embarked on agressive rebuilding of structures into which the returnees will settle, even as he pushes for the annihilation of Boko Haram and ISWAP terrorists, by complementing Military efforts with civilian components, including local hunters, vigilantes and Civilian Joint Task Force volunteers.


Zulum took very high risks by always being at the war front with the military, for which he has been attacked several times. Many people wonder where he gets the resources from to undertake some of the tasks when they see him rebuilding communities and giving out palliatives to displaced people and returnees.
While it may be true that the hinterland is still being terrorized by insurgents, it is also a truism that, a visitor to Maiduguri and major towns in Borno can attest to the rapid infrastructural transformations taking place under the governor. I have heard people refer to Maiduguri as the new Dubai, because of the changing face of the ancient city.


I will leave the specifics for those whose job it is to compile Governor Zulum’s leadership report sheet, but suffice it to state that, the story of despair being painted does not reflect the true situation, as those on ground are smiling with hopes that we have crossed the Rubicon, and the future of a peaceful and progressive Borno under Governor Babagana Umara Zulum is foreseeable.


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TY Danjuma and Nigeria’s present and future (1), by Hassan Gimba

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Lieutenant General Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma, former Chief of Army Staff, former minister of defence, better known as TY Danjuma or TY for short, is not an unknown face to Nigerians. Though some see him as controversial, others see him as a blunt man, a man who does not mince words, a man who does not pull punches, a man who suffers no fools. He is one among a very rare crop of Nigerian leaders on whom everyone has an opinion. Never colourless for people to be neutral where they stand with him. It is either you are for him or you are not.

However, whatever one’s views of TY, what cannot be denied him is his patriotism and nationalism. TY fought to keep Nigeria one. He also leaves no one in doubt that he will do so again. And again. He believes in one Nigeria and all his adult life he has worked to protect the country’s sovereignty, working for its greatness all the time.

To be honest, there is nothing that has not been written or said about him just as there is no recognition that he has not gotten or honour not conferred on him. As of now, he is about the most decorated Nigerian alive. His accolades have not been chiefly down to his fabulous wealth. No, not at all. After all, there are scores of Nigerians who are richer than him, yet they have not been half as recognised.

For instance, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, in 2003 organised a special convocation to confer on him an Honourary Doctor of Science. The university’s visitor, then President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, described him as his “hero and mentor”, saying he was “one of the most illustrious sons of our nation”.

For the former military president, General Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida, who chaired the occasion, no single Nigerian has contributed to the development of education in the country more than TY. The chancellor of the university, the Sultan of Sokoto, HRH Muhammad Sa’ad Abubakar III, in his remarks eulogised the award recipient as “a detribalised Nigerian who has transformed the lives of a significant number of people in the society.”

But Nigeria is now in perilous times that it needs the voice of people like TY Danjuma. Oh, his voice rankles those who do not want the truth, for sure. People blinded by sentiment never accept the truth from blunt, say-it-as-it-is patriots. In 2018, there was an outcry from mostly northern Muslims over his call on people to “rise and defend themselves against killers”. He made the call on March 24 that year, at the maiden convocation ceremony of Taraba State University in Jalingo, the state capital.

On April 2, in a write-up titled 2019 Election Timetable, TY Danjuma and Other Matters, I wrote: “This brings me to General T.Y. Danjuma and his call on people to defend themselves. Unfortunate as it is, especially coming from a personality no less than him, we should look deeply and dispassionately at the comments and situate them within the context of Nigeria’s current state.

“We also, side by side, have to keep in mind that it was Danjuma, once described by President Muhammadu Buhari as a soldier’s soldier, who, at the risk of his life or career, or both, led a northern revolt against General Aguyi Ironsi. Then the North believed, rightly or wrongly, that he was complicit in the killing of its leaders in the January 1966 coup. But then, the North had not been balkanised by its leaders into Muslim, Christian, Hausa-Fulani and the rest as it has now been by this crop of opportunistic, parasitic, self-serving, thieving and greedy so-called leaders.

“He fought to keep Nigeria one. He and the late General Shehu Musa Yar’adua were also there breathing down Obasanjo’s neck to keep faith with the 1979 return to democratic governance. And it was to a Northern Fulani Muslim the baton of governance was handed.

“In both major situations, Danjuma played pivotal roles for the North. He could have scuttled the 1979 hand over, but he didn’t. In all these cases he saw himself as a Nigerian and a Northerner. He is also believed to be one of Buhari’s staunchest financial and moral supporters throughout his various presidential candidacies when latter-day Buharists, who see nothing wrong in him now, were political foot soldiers elsewhere.

“Danjuma contributed at least $10m in 2014 for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of the Boko Haram-ravaged North East and is still contributing hugely to that cause through the Presidential Committee on the North-East Initiative (PCNI) while those now desperate to label him ‘barawo’ and their paymasters cannot be counted among those who have helped their suffering brothers in the North East in any material way, save, perhaps, in releasing insurgents in the name of “deradicalisation”.

“Yet, his comment is akin to giving up so late in his life of service to fatherland. So, what has happened to Nigeria now to warrant him losing faith in it – just like that? The Nigeria he fought for and served for almost all his life? This is what we must ask ourselves and answer dispassionately.

“Since the appearance of Boko Haram in the North East some ten years ago, I ask if there is anyone that, even if once, in the deepest recesses of his mind, has not thought of taking measures for self-defence? Why did we not fault Emir Sanusi Lamido Sanusi of Kano when he made the call on people to defend themselves? Was there no time that (some) Northern Muslim elders accused President Goodluck Jonathan of collaborating with the army to kill Northerners and reduce their voting population?

“Right now across our country, are people not feeling a heightened need to arm themselves for self-defence against armed robbers, kidnappers and bandits? That people had not done so is because they knew it was against the laws of the land but not because they believed they were secure enough. But people are frustrated and many would not dare to voice their frustrations publicly.

The Emir of Anka, in Zamfara State, Alhaji Attahiru Muhammad Ahmad, in tears, just called on the United Nations and the African Union to come to the aid of his people who are being killed like chickens almost daily. Yet Nigeria is a sovereign state.

“Let there be the rule of law and respect for human life. Government and its officials must abide by the laws. No one should be allowed to be above the law. People should not see government as vengeful or regarding courts and their judgments with disdain. People become law abiding when they see their government and its agents abiding by the laws of the land.

 A lot of wrongs have been done. A lot is being done, yet there is no justice for victims, neither are culprits seen to be punished as the law stipulates. We have not addressed a lot of extra-judicial killings and plain murders. We always move on as if we are a country of people with short memories.

“Let there be justice in the land. Let a criminal know he can’t kill, maim and abduct and go scot-free. Let those who should secure the citizens and those who should dispense justice know that they can’t be lax or collude with undesirable elements and go free or remain in their duty posts. Let a victim know that the state will always give him justice fast and in full measure.

“When the above is obtainable in society, definitely people like Citizen Danjuma won’t be making such comments. And if he does, no one will take him seriously.”

Someone who calls on people to defend themselves will know how to advise the government to protect the citizenry. Again, someone who has done more than anyone in the promotion of education will know how to resuscitate the education sector.

It is not while in service but in retirement that you know who is great and who shouldn’t be taken too seriously. He who lives a life of service to humanity in retirement should be the one to be trusted with the welfare of the people. And this is the life of TY Danjuma since retiring from active service in 1979.

Even though on a smaller scale and spread, being a non-governmental organisation, we can see that the TY Danjuma Foundation, established in 2009, has virtually taken over from where the Petroleum Trust Fund stopped.

Now that Boko Haram and its cousins – bandits, kidnappers and killer herdsmen – have shut down schools, making parents feel it is safer to keep their children at home than send them to school, Nigeria needs more of TY Danjuma as we will subsequently come to see.

Lest I Forget!

Why Are They Not Performing Umrah?

Prophet Muhammad (SAW) told us that if one performs Umrah during the month of Ramadan, it is as if he does Hajj with him. But he who feeds the needy during Ramadan will enter paradise together with him.

Hitherto our big men preferred to attend Hajj with the prophet than enter paradise with him.

This time around they were all forced to stay at home because in Saudi Arabia, they have scientific ways of knowing those injected with COVID-19 vaccines and they would turn those not injected back. To avoid being found out, they stayed back. Very embarrassing for the world to know it was just a ruse; their followers were just deceived.


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